ARE THE TORIES EVIL?

The emotive question whether Tories are actually evil was posed by Rafael Behr in the Guardian Opinion Column on 30 March. Good question! While acknowledging that one doesn’t have to stray far along the spectrum of left opinion to encounter this view, Mr Behr was inclined to dismiss the proposition. In his view crackpot conspiracy theories are increasingly shaping our view of governments and policies. But we do not need to resort to conspiracy theories to conclude that some Tory policies are intended to benefit only a tiny minority of the population and to damage the rest. If your personal morality leads you to conclude that those responsible are evil, so be it. Aneurin Bevan’s famous comment that Tories are “lower than vermin” comes to mind. Communists, however, tend to take a more objective and less personalised view. We see a struggle between classes in which the venality or otherwise of Tories is largely irrelevant.

A prime example of a Tory policy that is intended to benefit a tiny minority is the government’s flagship policy, Austerity. This is the policy of cutting expenditure on public services and social welfare in order to reduce government borrowing by 2020 to the level prevailing before the 2007 banking crisis. Austerity will result in a national economy by 2020 in which government spending on social services and welfare will be comparable to that in the US economy – a society where the poor get by on charity and food banks and where services such as health and education are provided to those who can afford them by profit driven corporations. Furthermore, this state of affairs is intended to be permanent. There is no government commitment to restore public services and amenities after government borrowing has been reduced to the 2007 level. What we get in 2020 is what, according to Tory intentions, we will be stuck with.

The lack of opposition to Austerity can be explained by a docile capitalist controlled media (including the BBC) and the residual, malign influence of New Labour on the Parliamentary Labour Party. Both accept the Thatcherite mantra There is No Alternative. Government borrowing needs to be reduced, but cuts in public services and social welfare is not the way to go about it. Proper taxation of corporations and scrapping Trident would go a long way to doing it.

Labour controlled local authorities have also been slow to blame the Tory government for the cuts to their services they are being forced to make, preferring to differentiate themselves from their local Tory opponents by claiming that their cuts are (slightly) more humane than those their opponents. This strategy has been criticised by the Labour Leader, Jeremy Corbyn and his criticism has been picked up by, amongst others Croydon TUC who will be sending a delegation to discuss the matter with Croydon Council Leader Tony Newman on Tuesday. We welcome this initiative by Croydon TUC and wish them well.

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CROYDON TUC CONVENES A CROYDON ASSEMBLY on 15 NOVEMBER 2014

The government has been trumpeting that economic recovery is under way: according to figures published by the Office of National Statistics, unemployment in the UK fell by 121,000 in the three months to May; the rate of unemployment fell to 6.5% from 6.6% in the three months to 31 March, l the lowest level in nearly six years; the number claiming jobseekers allowance has fallen to 1.04 million; and more than 78% of men and 68% of women are now in work.

The Tories are desperate to persuade enough of the electorate, or at least enough of the electorate who can be bothered to vote, that the economic crisis triggered by the bank collapse in 2008 is over. Nothing could be further from the truth.

After four years of austerity, government borrowing remains more or less where it was following the banking collapse. But reducing government borrowing was never what the coalition’s continuing austerity programme is about. It is an attack on the living standards of working people and it is succeeding. According to the Institute for Fiscal Studies, after inflation, the real, hourly pay of workers under the age of 30 has collapsed by 11% since 2008; and their household incomes are down 15%. Meanwhile, rents are up and the property market for buy-to-rent is soaring.
Every capitalist state requires a large pool of unemployed workers in order to subdue the rest and keep profits rolling in. This could be achieved with an even lower unemployment rate than we are currently experiencing – provided further measures are put in place to cow workers. This is why Cameron is threatening to further restrict trade unions and workplace rights and why there will be further tightening of unemployment and other benefits. These measures ensure that workers can be pressed into employment at rates of pay that scarcely provide for their subsistence and ensure that their kids will never be in a position to enjoy even this modest level of subsistence or have families of their own.
The solutions are obvious. We need the government to promote trade unions, not attack them. We need solid financial support for our young people before they enter employment, not student loans. We need a living wage, not the derisory minimum wage. We need security of tenure for tenants and a huge council house building programme. Only with a bedrock of social housing will the private sector curtail its exploitative behaviour. We need generous social security benefits and an end to attacks on claimants. We need a media that doesn’t attack the unemployed and foreigners, not one owned by billionaires who fund the Tories and yet don’t themselves pay tax.

The Labour Party, or at least a significant element within it, once supported all these measures. These days they believe in “equality of opportunity” and seek to appeal to upwardly mobile “hard working families”. Don’t they understand that for every family on the way up, there is one on the way down, and that working class families have kids and these kids won’t be in a position to start families if nothing is done?

If enough pressure is brought to bear on the Labour Party, it could be brought round again to progressive policies. This is the idea behind Croydon TUC’s recent decision to launch a Croydon Assembly, bringing together workers, special interest groups and local activists in the area. A meeting of the Assembly has been called for Saturday, 15 November at Ruskin House, South Croydon. The Communist Party gives this initiative its full support. Whether Labour can be shifted from the secure middle ground that offers it the prospect of winning, or at least sharing, power at the general election in 2015 as the ‘least worst option’ remains to be seen. One thing is clear. This is the last opportunity to attempt this. If Labour takes power and continues with further austerity and more neo-liberal policies, or indeed, if it loses the election having stood on a platform of such policies, we will have to conclude that, as they say, the party’s over.