CROYDON MAY DAY MARCH

As the coverage in the Morning Star on 2 May demonstrated, May Day is an important day for workers across the world but governments in the UK including, regrettably, Labour governments, have sought to de-politicise it by offering a Bank Holiday on the first Monday in May. Saturday, 5 May is therefore the first opportunity for many of us to celebrate May Day as it should be celebrated – an expression of our solidarity with all working people. The Croydon Communist Party will therefore be joining trade unionists and other progressive forces on the Croydon May Day March and Rally on Saturday, 5 May and encourages others to join us.

Marchers will assemble outside Marks & Spencer, North End Croydon at 12 Noon. We march off at 12.30 with flags and banners waving, led by the Schiehallian Pipe Band, and make our way up North End to the High Street and Coombe Road to rally at Ruskin House, 23 Coombe Road, CR0 1BD which also happens to be the HQ for the Communist Party and the office of Croydon CP. Speakers from 1.30 pm will include Ted Knight, Chair of the Croydon Assembly, Kevin O Brien Unison/Merton & Sutton TUC, Ellen Lebethe, Vice President NPC and Patsy Cummings (Croydon Labour Party).

 

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A Reverse National Lottery?

The Croydon CP Collective has been converted into a full Communist Party branch. We will meet at 6.30 pm on the third Thursday of each month  at Party Centre, Ruskin House, 23 Coombe Road, Croydon CR0 1BD. Meanwhile, here is a personal reflection on the National Lottery.

A Reverse National Lottery?

With the chance of being struck by lightning in the UK one in three million, the odds on winning the National Lottery jackpot prior to October of one in 14 million didn’t look too encouraging. Since October, however, the odds of winning the jackpot have fallen to one in 45 million. With such unfavorable odds, the justification for buying a lottery ticket might still be justified by the fact that 28% of what you paid for your ticket goes to “good causes”. But isn’t that what taxation is supposed to do? Thus in practice the National Lottery actually functions as a somewhat inefficient tax. But is it a tax on the gullible or the poor?

A study carried out in 2009 by Theo’s, a British think-tank, found, unsurprisingly, that the poor spent a greater part of their income on lottery tickets than rich ones. Expenditure by the mega-rich is, of course, insignificant – what’s another million pounds when one has billions? Other interesting findings come from US studies. In South Carolina, for example, households with incomes of less than $40,000 a year account for 28% of the state’s population but more than half of its frequent lottery players. According to a Tax Foundation study, more than one American in five thinks that buying lottery tickets constitutes a sound retirement plan.

Regardless, however, of the poor chance of any one individual winning the National Lottery jackpot, someone has to win. That, after all, is the pitch made by the National Lottery to punters. Over the last 20 years, the National Lottery has created five billionaires and 4,000 millionaires. The question must, however be asked: do we actually need five more billionaires and 4,000 more millionaires in the UK? As Thomas Piketty has demonstrated, we are now a more unequal society than at any time since the Edwardian era. Don’t we have enough billionaires and millionaires already?

Equality in the UK would be improved if the National Lottery were scrapped and the “good causes” were supported by progressive taxation. But could we go further than this? One idea to ponder is a Reverse National Lottery. There are thought to be more than 100 billionaires in the UK. Could we not require each one to take up a ticket every week with the ‘winner’ paying , say, £1 million to the Exchequer to fund “good causes”? Just like the current lottery it would generate lots of public interest, media attention and overall fun, while “good causes” would be provided for from the proceeds. The one difference would be that inequality in the UK would go down each week, not up. Now wouldn’t that be a good idea?